OhioNET News

We've been very busy bees at OhioNET during this first month of 2019. All the events listed below have been added and opened for registration in the last few weeks.  As always, you can head to the Training Calendar for a full listing of all our currently available continuing education opportunities.

Digitization Basics 1: Plan Before You Scan
Tuesday, March 5, 2:30 PM to 4:00 PM
Presenter: Jenni Salamon (Ohio History Connection)

Exploring Our Statewide Resources: Business Reference Sources
Thursday, April 25, 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM
Presenters: Joe Ceterski (EBSCO) and Megan Sheeran (Upper Arlington Public Library)

Get Started with Grant Writing
Tuesday, April 30, 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM
Presenter: Cindy Boyden (State Library of Ohio)

Micro-Assessments: Quick and Easy Approaches to Data Collection
Wednesday, May 1, 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM
Presenters: Colleen Boff & Linda Rich (Bowling Green State University Libraries)

Exploring Our Statewide Resources: Transparent Language
Tuesday, May 14, 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM
Presenters: Lauren Gancarz (Transparent Language) and Megan Sheeran (Upper Arlington Public Library)

How to Grassroots: Limitless Possibilities Through Community-Based Solutions
Tuesday, May 21, 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM
Presenters: Shane Hoffman (Plain City Public Library), Gina Maida (University of Mt. Union), Kate McCartney (Marysville Public Library), and Sarah Schaff (Denison University)

Think searching tools are all the same?  Ever read the fine print in the license agreements for your e-resource subscriptions? Join us for this thought-provoking discussion that will shine a light on the algorithms and assumptions that underpin the resources we use every day and discuss the pitfalls and limitations you may encounter when using Google, subscription databases, and other resources.

Rebooting Reference and the Myth of Technological Neutrality
Thursday, April 4, 2:30 PM to 3:30 PM
Presenters: Don Boozer (Cleveland Public Library) and Bill Meltzer (Worthington Libraries)

Can't make it in real-time?  Sign up and be sure to get the link to review the recording of our session at your convenience.

After many years of reliability and success, Honeywell has decided to retire the Voyager™ 9520 and 9540 barcode scanners and replace them with the new Voyager™ 1250g.  OhioNET is able to offer it to you at a special introductory price through February 28, 2019. 

Building on the legacy of the world-renowned Voyager™ series of scanners, Honeywell’s Voyager 1250g single-line laser scanner provides a superior out-of-box experience and aggressive reading of linear bar codes, including larger bar codes up to 23 inches away.  This plug and play scanner incorporates a multi-interface design with automatic interface detection. Simply plug the cable into the host system and the Voyager 1250g will automatically configure itself to the appropriate interface, shortening the installation process. For users who require hands-free scanning, the stand can be assembled quickly and easily.  The stand and cable are included, along with a 5-year manufacturer’s warranty.

 

 

Honeywell Voyager™ 1250g USB Barcode Scanner*
(Available in Black or Ivory)
OhioNET Member Price - $135.45

*Includes Scanner, Hands-Free Stand, Cable and Free Shipping

To take advantage of this special pricing, please place your orders by Thursday, February 28, 2019.

 

For product availability, questions, or to place an order,
please contact Pam Rossman at
800-686-8975, ext. 10 or email pamr@ohionet.org
To see what other products OhioNET has to offer, go to:
https://www.ohionet.org/products

With the variably icy roads and bitter cold conditions in Columbus, OhioNET will be delaying our opening on 1/30 until 10am.

We hope that all of our members stay safe and warm!

As hubs of the communities they serve, libraries often find themselves on the front lines of many difficult societal issues from addiction, to homelessness, to unemployment and more. For families and communities struggling with traumatic situations, hope can be hard to come by.  Sometimes, you have to borrow it, and the library can be a place to find it.  Plan to attend our upcoming webinar to discuss ways in which libraries can make small changes that can have a big impact and to learn how trauma-informed libraries can implement programming, initiate outreach, and equip librarians to better serve communities.

Libraries Lending Hope: Trauma-Informed Service
Thursday, March 14, 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM
Presenter: Dr. Meghan Harper, Kent State University - School of Information.

Can't make it in real-time?  Sign up and be sure to get the link to review the recording of our session at your convenience.

Copyright issues are common in library land, but it’s easy to feel overwhelmed by all the considerations and exceptions.  This introductory session in our series will provide all the foundational vocabulary and concepts you’ll need to take advantage of our whole set of webinars.  Attendees will discuss what is/not copyrightable, ownership & duration of copyright, author’s rights, and infringement pitfalls.

Copyright Basics: Overview & Review
Tuesday, February 26, 2:30 PM to 4:00 PM

Got copyright questions?  Our webinar series presenter, Carla Myers, has created a regular column for our newsletter to answer them.  Use the following link to submit your question today: https://www.ohionet.org/your-copyright-questionsanswered

Learn how you can get the most out of your promotion and marketing investments with a new, community-based event aggregator, Burbio (www.burbio.com). Free to schools, libraries, government agencies, and non-profits, Burbio partners with institutions to automatically pull existing event data, send reminders and updates, and let users explore all kinds of community events in one place.  In addition to a demonstration of the platform, attendees will also hear perspectives from Ohio library staff already working with Burbio.

Keep Your Community Connected with Burbio
Wednesday, Feb. 6th, 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM

This webinar is free and open to all library staff working in Ohio. For a complete listing of all our currently available events, head to the Training Calendar.  If you have any questions about this or other OhioNET events, don't hesitate to contact us. We're always happy to help.

 

Hello! I am honored to be here. My journey has been an interesting one, winding through law and corporate America to nonprofits and library school. I am fortunate to be joining OhioNET, an organization with a history of living its values not only through advocacy and collaboration, but also by growing talent and capacity in its support of librarians’ professional development.

I look forward to working in Ohio, a state that has a national reputation for excellence in support of libraries and resource sharing. Thank you to those of you in the library community who have already reached out and made me feel welcome. As I get to know Ohio, I look forward to meeting even more of you and learning about the innovative things you are doing in your own libraries and communities. Here’s to a great 2019!

We're pleased to announce that OhioNET is directly partnering with the State Library of Ohio to bring you ILEAD USA--Ohio 2019! If you are interested in a program to encourage Ohio library staff at all levels and from all library types to meet 21st-Century needs with interactive participatory tools in a fun and casual environment, then apply to this year's ILEAD today.

ILEAD USA – Ohio is a team-based library leadership program that teaches librarians to work with each other, develop their leadership skills, and use participatory and emerging technologies to solve a clear problem in their community.

Team Members:  We are looking for up to 5 teams of 4 to 5 individuals to make up the participants for the ILEAD USA – Ohio 2019 program.  Teams are made up of individuals who have identified a community problem and are interested in learning how to use technology to solve that community need. Preference will be given to teams that are made up of individuals representing at least two different library types and at least three different libraries.  Teams must apply as a single entity.  This means that you will need all four or five of your team members and a project idea before submitting your application.  If you need assistance creating a team or developing your idea, please contact Evan T. Struble at estruble@library.ohio.gov or 614-752-9178. If you’re still not sure about the program, consider attending an upcoming webinar: ILEAD USA—Ohio: What’s It All About? (Webinar details coming soon.)

WHEN:

ILEAD USA - Ohio will be held March 19-21, June 11-13 and October 22-24 in 2019. Team members must commit to attending all three sessions of ILEAD USA - Ohio.  Your commitment also involves time devoted between the three sessions to working on your project with your team. 

WHERE:

Mohican State Park & Lodge, in Perrysville, Ohio

HOW:

The only costs associated with ILEAD USA - Ohio are the costs of your travel to/from Mohican State Park & Lodge.  The remainder of the costs of this program (lodging, meals and materials) is paid for by the State Library of Ohio and OhioNET, with federal funds from the Institute of Museum and Library Services.

WHY:

Librarians have needs in their communities that can be solved by working with other librarians and by utilizing technological advances.  ILEAD USA – Ohio is a program that helps librarians learn:

  • To identify those needs;
  • To work with other librarians to solve community problems; and
  • To use the participatory technology necessary to improve their communities.

Team application available: http://library.ohio.gov/documents/ilead-usa-ohio-application/

Contact Evan T. Struble (estruble@library.ohio.gov) at the State Library of Ohio with any questions regarding ILEAD USA - Ohio.  Applications are due no later than January 31, 2019 at 5:00 pm.   Team members will be notified of acceptance in early February 2019.

This event is made possible through funding from The Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS).

US copyright law impacts almost every facet of librarianship and it is not uncommon for library staff to encounter copyright questions and issues on a daily basis. Some of these questions and issues arise as part of the services libraries offer and can include (but are certainly not limited to) circulating books, sharing copies of articles via Interlibrary Loan, or reusing copyrighted images and graphics in marketing materials promoting library programming. Other times we are asked copyright questions by patrons, e.g. “How many recipes can I photocopy from this cookbook before I’m violating copyright law?” or “Can I post a PDF copy of this article I downloaded from one of the library databases online for my students to read?”. This column will provide a forum for OhioNET members to ask questions about copyright law and learn more about the rights and responsibilities granted to those creating copyrightable works or looking to reuse copyrightable works created by others. It is my hope that the information provided here will help readers confidently respond to copyright issues and that may arise as part of their day-to-day job responsibilities and better prepare them to answer copyright questions asked by library patrons.

Readers can submit their copyright questions to be answered in future newsletters using this form.

 

Our first question explores licensing issues...

Question: The library purchased an article for a professor from a journal we don’t own. They would like to share the article with their class, and we believe the professor will continue doing this for several semesters. Should this professor place the article in Canvas as a PDF, where it is protected by password for their class only, or should they place the printed copy of the article on course reserve?  Is there another option?

 

Answer: Because this individual article was purchased specifically for the professor, you first want to check to see if there were terms and conditions put forward by the vendor as part of the purchase that may control how it can be used. It will not be unheard of or unusual if the vendor had terms and conditions in-place that states something along the lines of “the copy of the article is intended for the personal use of the patron it was purchased for and cannot be shared with others in print or electronic form.” If such terms were agreed to as part of the purchase, then it would be a violation of them for a copy of the article to be posted to the professor’s Canvas course page or for a printed copy to be circulated via course reserves.

If there were no terms and conditions connected to the purchase of the article -or- if there were terms and conditions that were agreed to as part of the purchase but they did not specifically address the reuse and the sharing of copies of the article with others, then fair use (17 United States Code, Section 117) or the TEACH Act (17 United States Code, Section 110[2]) can be considered for making a copy of the article available to students via the professor’s Canvas course page, or fair use could be considered for circulating a printed copy of the article via course reserves.

Another option available to you would be obtaining a copy of the article from another library under fair use or under the “Limitations on exclusive rights: Reproduction by libraries and archives” exception found in Section 108 of US copyright law. Libraries frequently utilize these two exceptions when taking part in Interlibrary Loan lending and borrowing. So long as no specific reuse terms and conditions like those I outlined above are added on to the transaction by the lending library or are placed upon the patron utilizing this service by their home library, then the patron is free to consider using exceptions found in US copyright law for reuses of the copy of the work provided to them. In this situation, that could include considering fair use or the TEACH Act if they are a professor looking to share the work with their students via a Canvas course page, or fair use if they wish to make a print copy available via course reserve.